Johannes Leonardo

Gazelle launch

NOTHING IS SACRED. ADIDAS STEALS FROM ITS HISTORY TO CREATE ITS FUTURE.

ADIDAS ORIGINALS HAS LOOKED BACK TO FIND ITS WAY FORWARD. FOR THE RETURN OF GAZELLE, A SNEAKER WHICH HAS BEEN TAKEN FROM STYLE TRIBE TO STYLE TRIBE, CHANGING ITS MEANING IN CULTURE WITH EVERY EXCHANGE, THE BRAND RETURNED TO AN ICONIC 90'S PHOTO OF KATE MOSS - AND THREW OUT ALL THE RULES OF OWNERSHIP.

Summer 2016. adidas Originals, riding a tidal wave of success on its global Future campaign, was preparing to reintroduce the world to one of its most iconic silhouettes to date - the sneaker that had been passed down from one style tribe to the next throughout time, Gazelles.

 

For the sneaker no one group could ever own, came an idea that challenged every idea we had about ownership.

 

Returning once again to its archival history, the brand resurrected an iconic image from the '90s, featuring Kate Moss in the original Gazelles - then handed it over to someone who had no respect for ownership: famed re-appropriation artist and cultural provocateur, @bessNYC4.

 

The artist reinterpreted the image from the canvas up.  Hacking, duplicating, deleting whole sections outright.

 

Then, the re-appropriator became the re-appropriated.

In Septemeber of 2016, adidas Originals took this reimagined image, and handed it over once again to French director Maxime Bruneel. The result was a visceral art film - a hybrid of unexpected live action and bewildering animaiton - that chronicled the transformation of the original images to the re-appropriated piece created by @bessNYC4.

A statement told in two acts.  A message to creators to take what inpsires them, and run with it.  And a reminder to everyone who has ever felt creatively held-back, nothing is sacred.